I’ve been feeling pretty low this week. No particular reason, but it’s just been cold and snowy and blah. Well, today was a different story! It warmed up enough for me to enjoy my outdoor yard duty at recess (gently falling snow, kindergarteners making snow angels, children throwing snow in each other’s faces… the joys of winter), so I left school feeling renewed and even a little refreshed!

So refreshed that I was seized by the sudden urge to arrange flowers! And then photograph them! In the SNOW!

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I tried to be more disciplined about taking “during” shots, so that you could see the process that goes into creating a bouquet like this. It really is the easiest thing!

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I used a combination of deep red and peach alstromeria, and peachy-pink ruffly carnations. I know what you’re thinking: “carnations are SO 1981!” Well, I thought that too, but they really can be a fabulous alternative to roses or peonies if you are doing an event on a limited budget. If you get them with a tight centre and then blow on the outer edges, it gives it that frilled look of a garden rose or peony. Something to think about if you want to save money on your next arrangement. (Or if you are a bride on a budget!)

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I always choose one or two really pretty blooms to act as the centre of the bouquet or arrangement. See what I mean about those ruffles?!

Exhibit A: peach carnation from Loblwas – $1    Exhibit B: peach mini garden rose +/- $6 at a florist

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                                                                                                       photo courtesy of Fifty Flowers

I rest my case.

Once I’ve established the centre of my bouquet, I keep building around it, alternating blooms and colours, and always crossing the stems in the same direction. This give the bouquet flexibility and stability. Stuff won’t be slipping out all the time, and it’s much easier to re-position the blooms.

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Once you have your bouquet, put an elastic around the base and be sure to check it out from all angles in a mirror. You can decide on a front at this point. You need to choose a front if you are doing any fancy wrapping techniques, like the one I used. (And by “fancy” I mean “so simple a monkey could do it but it looks like a million bucks”.)

When you’re happy with your bouquet, wrap the stems with floral tape. This stuff is made to get wet, so if you are doing a bouquet and need to leave it overnight, just plop it in water and wrap the ribbon in the morning. I talk more about some wrapping techniques in this post.

Once I had wrapped my bouquet, I took it outside (which is the Canadian thing to do) and had some fun taking pictures. Oh boy, I cannot wait to buy myself a new camera! But that is a topic for another post…

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And just so that you can see HOW DEDICATED I am to you, dear readers, here is a photo of what my boots looked like post-photo shoot. You’re welcome.

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Now please excuse me while I wrap up in a blanket and drink hot cocoa. xo

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You can catch up on the first Wing it Wednesday here.

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